Category Archives: Uncategorized

We are hiring!

First Class Physiotherapy is a private practice in the heart of Glasgow City Centre. Our services include physiotherapy, massage therapy, exercise classes, biomechanical assessments and work-place physiotherapy. We treat and manage a wide variety of musculoskeletal conditions, the emphasis being on postural injuries and weekend warriors.

In our private exercise studio we hold regular small group stretch and foam rolling classes and carry out exercise rehabilitation sessions. We strive to work closely as a team in a professional and friendly environment.

We are looking for a part-time, employed, senior Physiotherapist to join our team. The position involves a combination of early and late shifts, over 2-3 days. Excellent manual therapy and exercise rehabilitation skills; a keen interest in sports injuries and spinal conditions; and experience in private practice are essential. Postgraduate qualifications in Pilates, acupuncture or dry needling are desirable. The ideal candidate would be highly professional, passionate, work pro-actively to establish their case load, and be confident to work alone but also as part of a team.

Please send a covering letter outlining why you believe you are a good candidate for this position and your CV.

Closing Date: Monday 9th October 2017 at 5pm

Start Date: asap

Job Type: Part-time

Qualifications and Skills

You should be registered with the HCPC and CSP, and have at least 3 years MSK experience.

Acupuncture and pilates are desirable

Qualification Questions

  • How many years of MSK experience do you have?
  • Have you completed the following level of education: Bachelor’s?
  • Do you speak English?

We Need You!

First Class Physiotherapy is an innovative multi-disciplinary private practice in Glasgow city centre.

We are looking for a part-time Chartered Physiotherapist to join our dynamic team at First Class Physiotherapy.

we-need-you-jpeg-184x250The ideal candidate will be hard working and interested in private practice. He/she should be competent working on their own initiative and keen to learn and develop their skills in private practice.

The case load is variable and includes spinal, sports injuries and rehabilitation, along with potential for working with international sports teams and covering our classes. Shift times are flexible, but ideally the candidate would be available to work 4-8 hours each day over 3-5 days starting in late-September 2016.

If you are interested please send your CV and details to info@firstclassphysio.co.uk. If you have any questions or would like more information please feel free to contact either Rachel or Jennifer on 0141 237 2721 or at info@firstclassphysio.co.uk.

Closing date: 5pm on 15th September 2016.

Interviews will take place between  23-26th September 2016.

Classes

Each week we have a series of classes and groups led by qualified, experienced physiotherapists who want to help you get more out of your day. Usually taking between 45 minutes and an hour, our activities range from foam rolling and stretch classes to our running group and biomechanical assessments. This means you have the potential to become fitter, stronger, more flexible and supple, have the chance to exercise with others and take some much needed time for yourself.

Here’s a list of activities (our biomechanical assessments can be booked any time; they’re a tailored service for each individual):

  • Tuesday          Running Group          5.15pm for 5.30pm
    • starting at our clinic across from Central Station (2.11 Standard Buildings, 94 Hope Street)
  • Wednesday    Foam Rolling Class    5.15pm
  • Thursday        Stretch Class               12.30pm

You can attend an individual class for £6 or book a block of 7 stretch or foam roll classes for £36. Each week at the running group costs £3, and we provide drinks (non-alcoholic) at the end.

If you’d like to book, or find out more about what we do, call 0141 2372 721, or email us on info@firstclassphysio.co.uk.

International Women’s Day – a different take

I’m reading a lot of posts about it being International Women’s Day today, and one in particular stood out:

“’Here’s to equality for women worldwide’. Fair enough, but yet to see International Men’s Day” – Anon

Now, I’m all for celebrating women worldwide, in the workplace, at home and everywhere else for that matter, but I’m inclined to agree with the above post. Should we have an International Men’s Day to celebrate what the male of the species bring to life?

From quotehd.com

From quotehd.com

The whole subject has been ringing bells for me as this is my first full day back at work since having my baby daughter last August. Now more than ever do I realise what my Mum and countless other working Mums do for us every day. Physiotherapy tends to be a female dominated profession, and has this in common with lots of the caring professions like nursing, occupational therapy, massage therapy and child care to name a few. Should we be questioning why more women than men choose these professions, or should we just accept that maybe many women prefer a “caring” role in the workplace? Have they actively chosen their paths, or has society steered them in that direction? Does it matter what any of us does for work, as long as we’re good at it?

And on that note, why celebrate just women when we can all be thankful for one another’s contributions today?

While I’m celebrating the achievements of women who can take care of their little ones, keep a house and also get to work with clothes on their back and ideas in their brain (a feat I’ll tell you, ask Kim Kardashian), I also feel like high-fiving my husband who also works, keeps a house and takes care of a child. This is equality. And this is what many men as well as women are doing today and every day, so high fives all round.

3 + 1 = You!

First Class Physiotherapy is an innovative multi-disciplinary private practice in Glasgow city centre.

We are looking for a part-time Chartered Physiotherapist to join our dynamic team of 3 at First Class Physiotherapy.

The ideal candidate will be hard working and interested in private practice. He/she should be competent working on their own initiative and keen to learn and develop their skills in private practice.

The case load is variable and includes spinal, sports injuries and rehabilitation. Shift times are flexible, but ideally the candidate would be available to work 4-8 hours over 3-5 days starting in mid-June 2015.

If you are interested please send your CV and details to info@firstclassphysio.co.uk. If you have any questions or would like more information please feel free to contact either Rachel or Jennifer on 0141 237 2721 or at info@firstclassphysio.co.uk.

Closing date: 5pm on 20th May 2015

Interviews will take place between  27-28th  May 2015.

This is how we roll (and stretch)

Launching our new exercise classes

This month we will be launching our new exercise classes, starting with our stretch class on Thursday lunchtimes and our Wednesday evening foam rolling class. Classes will last approximately 40 minutes in the gym at the clinic.

http://goo.gl/yVC6Qh Image from: http://www.123rf.com/stock-photo/exercise.html

http://goo.gl/yVC6Qh Image from: http://www.123rf.com/stock-photo/exercise.html

To book the classes and reap some of the benefits of renewed flexibility and better posture just email us at info@firstclassphysio.co.uk (using the subject heading “STRETCH CLASS” or “FOAM ROLL CLASS”) or call 0141 2372 721.

You can purchase a block of 7 in advance for £36 or pay £6 per class on arrival.

This is how I roll Image from http://krisdoeskettlebells.wordpress.com/2013/06/05/its-how-i-roll-baby/

This is how I roll Image from http://krisdoeskettlebells.wordpress.com/2013/06/05/its-how-i-roll-baby/

Foam Rolling
Wednesday’s at 5.15pm, commencing on 29th April 2015.

This soft tissue release technique helps lengthen structures which become tight, it also helps with improving blood flow and flushing out toxins from the body. Releasing the tension helps correct movement patterns allowing for enhanced performance. This all sounds great, but don’t be fooled as certain areas may be a little tender. However, you will feel taller and more relaxed after.

Stretch
Thursday’s at 12.30pm, commencing on 23rd April 2015.

This full body stretch consists of dynamic and static stretches (see website for more info: ow.ly/LAcz4). Again this helps improve general flexibility, flushing out waste products and reduces the build up of stress/ tension which can lead to muscle pain and postural problems. Working from the toes upwards this will leave your body feeling more relaxed and supple.

We’re adjusting our prices

We want to let you know we’re adjusting our prices for physiotherapy and massage. You’ll see the changes appear in April 2015, in line with the new tax year (and you can find out more information below).

Over the last 3 years, we’re proud to have provided excellent treatment and evidence-based care to thousands of people in Glasgow and the surrounding area at competitive and fair prices, and we will continue to do so with your support.

Thank you for being part of our journey so far.

 

The First Class Physiotherapy Team

 

 

Initial Assessment –  £45 (unchanged)

Follow-up treatment – £40

Deep tissue massage – 30 minutes   £32

– 60 minutes   £50

Swedish massage – 30 minutes   £29

– 60 minutes   £45

Are you looking for a new challenge?

First Class Physiotherapy is an innovative multi-disciplinary private practice in Glasgow city centre.

 

We are looking for part-time Chartered Physiotherapists to join our dynamic team at First Class Physiotherapy.

The ideal candidate will be hard working and interested in private practice. He/she should be competent working on their own initiative and keen to learn and develop their skills in private practice.

 

The case load is variable and includes spinal, sports injuries and rehabilitation. Shift times are flexible, but ideally the candidate would be available to work 4-8 hours over 5 days.

 

If you are interested please send your CV and details to info@firstclassphysio.co.uk. If you have any questions or would like more information please feel free to contact either Rachel or Jennifer on 0141 237 2721 or at info@firstclassphysio.co.uk.

 

Closing date: 5pm on Monday 10th November 2014

Interviews will take place between 24th and 28th November 2014.

We’re moving

We are moving!

As some of you may be aware we are moving premises.

Over the last few months we have been working hard to find the perfect space for a bigger and better clinic and we have finally found one.

From 27th October we will be working from our new office in the Standard Building, 94 Hope Street. To find us in the building, make your way up to the 2nd floor, through the door at the top of the stairs and follow the corridor around to the left to Suite 2.11.

We will still be contactable on the same numbers and email address after the move.

T: 0141 23 72 721                                    M: 07730 45 99 88
E: info@firstclassphysio.co.uk              W: www.firstclassphysio.co.uk

We look forward to hearing from you soon.

Stretching – to do or not to do?

Ask anyone involved in any kind of sport or exercise if they stretch and you’re likely to hear one of 2 answers: “Yes, religiously” or “No, not as much as I should!”

So what should we be doing and when should we be doing it? Well, in this blog we’ll have a look at when to stretch, along with some examples of stretching for different muscle groups at different times (and while we’re at it, we’ll define the various kinds of stretch too).

Stretching your hamstrings

Stretching your hamstrings

Types of stretching

Static stretching is just what it says on the tin – stretching and holding in one position (see our “models” on the left). Usually the hold is for a standard 20 or 30 seconds, but some people like to hold a static stretch using breaths as a measure (e.g. 5 inhales and exhales for one stretch).

Dynamic stretching is stretching while moving. This is a gentle “swing” through your full range of motion, but without pushing too hard at the end of the stretch. For example jogging forward kicking your heels up to your bottom is a good dynamic quad stretch that doesn’t push the muscle beyond its natural range.

Ballistic stretching is holding a muscle at its maximum length and “bouncing” it to try to increase that length. It is almost never recommended, as it can actually cause muscles to tighten or even tear as they are over-stretched. Imagine trying to touch your toes and consistently jerking you fingers closer to the floor each time. Your hamstrings would very likely complain with this movement!

When is best?

Now we’ve covered stretching terms, but when should we carry out each different type of stretching?

Traditionally, people stretched statically before any kind of exercise, but this has been shown to do more harm than good. Herda and colleagues conducted a study on men in their 20s using methods to measure hamstring strength after different kinds of stretching. They found that the muscles could generate more power after dynamic stretching than following static stretching.

Another study by Wallmann and colleagues in 2012 looked at stretching the hip flexors (iliopsoas muscle) before a sprint, and how much difference this made to the performance of healthy recreational runners. Without stretching, the subjects ran the fastest. The next fastest runs were after the dynamic stretching, and the slowest runs were after static stretching. So it seems that not stretching at all before an activity could be best – but the key part is the warm-up and it’s important to note that in this study, the runners all had a warm-up first.

When Samson and his colleagues looked at different warm-ups and different types of stretching, they found that an activity-specific warm-up improved sprint times more than a general warm-up. They also found that static stretching increased the range of movement in the subjects better than dynamic stretching (but didn’t improve speed).

So in short, static stretching before exercise can actually worsen performance in sports that require explosive movements like sprinting (and can actually decrease your muscle power by around 3%), and dynamic stretching has been shown to be not quite as detrimental but can still negatively affect performance.

None of this looks particularly encouraging for stretching pre-exercise at all, does it?

Here’s where the warm-up comes in.

Don’t be confused – even dynamic stretching does not equal a warm-up as such.

Warm Up Image courtesy of Sura Nualpradid/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Warm Up Image courtesy of Sura Nualpradid/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The best warm-ups consist of an activity-specific and aerobic exercise to get your blood pumping and start your body moving in the way your intended exercise program is designed. Your muscles, nerves and other soft tissues need blood (and its nutrients and oxygen) in order to work, and a warm-up will help deliver these slowly at first, then more efficiently so that you can reach your maximum performance during your workout. Warming up also lubricates your joints, and reduces the risk of your muscles becoming prematurely fatigued.

So for instance a sprinter might do a warm-up of walking, lunges, jogging and then running before finally engaging in sprinting. A footballer might do some jogging followed by some mid-height kicks or mid-paced direction changes with some ball work to warm them up for a game.

So should we stretch after a warm-up? Well, you could do, but the point of the warm-up is to get your blood pumping so your body is ready for exercise. If you have to stop in order to stretch, your heart rate will slow again, defeating the purpose. You could do a second warm-up before exercising but not all of us have the time for that!

Does stretching have any use at all?

Yes indeed! This might seem like an anti-stretching article, but stretching can have fantastic benefits. Right after you cool down (again, doing the same sorts of activity-specific movements as in your warm-up), you should stretch. This should help your soft tissues get rid of the waste products built up during exercise, as well as return your physiological responses (metabolic, heart and breathing rates etc) to normal. Stretching probably doesn’t prevent injury as such, nor will it prevent a loss of power that generally follows on the next 2-3 days after a good workout, but it can have an effect on improving your muscle soreness on the days following your workout (especially in your abdomen and back), which can be a huge drawback to exercise. Plus it’s a nice relaxing way to finish a session.

If you want to improve your flexibility in general, you could take part in a yoga class (and don’t be fooled by its laid-back reputation – depending on the teacher and the type of yoga, it can be pretty hard work!) Pilates is also an excellent way of improving your joint range of motion, your muscle suppleness and flexibility in a low-impact way. But make sure before you do any static stretching that you don’t intend on running any personal best sprints straight after!

As with starting any form of exercise, particularly if you are entirely new to it, seek advice from a registered health professional before you begin. If you’d like to ask us a question, or book in for one of our prehabilitation appointments, please call us on 0141 2372 721 or browse our website for more information www.firstclassphysio.co.uk.